News — Coin History

The History of the Roosevelt Dime

Posted by Derek Sawchenko on

The History of the Roosevelt Dime
The Roosevelt dime was minted in 1946 and replaced the Mercury dime. It weighs about 2.268 Grams and the diameter is 17.91 Millimeters or 0.705 of an inch and the edges are reeded. The designer, John R. Sinnock was also the designer of the Franklin half dollar. His initials can be found at the bottom of the dime below Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Neck. 

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What is the Trade Dollar?

Posted by Derek Sawchenko on

What is the Trade Dollar?
The trade dollar weighs about 27.216 grams and is about 1.5 inches in diameter. It has a reeded edge like on most coins such as the quarter and dime. The trade dollar was used for international trade amongst various different countries hence the name “trade dollar”.

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$5 Gold Eagle Collection: 1844 PCGS MS64

Posted by Derek Sawchenko on

$5 Gold Eagle Collection: 1844 PCGS MS64

Despite a mintage of 340,330 coins, the 1844 $5 Gold Liberty is moderately rare in all grades. Most known examples are significantly worn and AU or uncirculated examples are surprisingly rare. There are only 4 other 1844s in this grade and 1 graded higher as an MS65 by PCGS.

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What do we know about the 2021 Morgan Silver Dollar So Far?

Posted by Derek Sawchenko on

What do we know about the 2021 Morgan Silver Dollar So Far?
Once the bill is confirmed, there is speculation about what coins the mint will actually produce. They could strike proof and uncirculated Morgan Silver Dollars at Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco. In addition, there may be marks added to commemorate the New Orleans and Carson City Mints where coins are no longer minted. The Peace Dollar is also apart of this bill and there is a high relief coin expected to be minted out of Philadelphia.

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Who Was Titus? | Ancient Roman Coins

Posted by Derek Sawchenko on

Who Was Titus? | Ancient Roman Coins
He was emperor during some very trying times including the cataclysmic eruption of Vesuvius, which buried half the towns of the Bay of Naples, including Pompeii in 79 AD and a fire in Rome in 80 AD. He was described as handsome, charming and generous. Titus once complained that he had lost a day because twenty-four hours passed without his bestowing a gift. He was, however, generous to a fault, which depleted the treasury. If he had ruled longer, he might have brought the empire to bankruptcy and lost his popularity. He died of illness in 81 A.D., succeeded by his brother Domitian.

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